La Salle Univeristy students celebrate Eagles victory

News

Kylie McGovern, Editor

One could feel the nervousness and tension on the afternoon of Jan. 29 on La Salle University’s campus before the Philadelphia Eagles game commenced. Students gathered to watch the game both on and off campus. The Philadelphia Eagles defeated the San Francisco 49ers 31-7 which won the Birds not only the NFC Championship but also a spot in the Super Bowl. 

Around campus, there were lots of cheers and  excitement which continued throughout the evening. La Salle Students flocked to the Olney Transportation Center just a few minutes away from campus to head downtown and celebrate the win with the greater community in the City of Brotherly Love. 

Hugs and High fives were exchanged in the station, as well as upward to ten repeats of the Eagles fight song. Many La Salle Students got off the Broad Street Line at the City Hall stop to join their fellow Philadelphians in the heart of the city. Fireworks painted the sky and the music of rappers from Philadelphia filled the air with a spirit of hope and community. This spirit of hope seems to be a quintessential part of being a Philadelphia sports fan, but the spirit of community is a quintessential part of being Lasallian. 

Although these celebrations of sports victory seem fairly surface level, riding back up to campus with fellow students, some who knew each other well and others who were practically strangers, showed a deeper meaning of community. Everyone celebrating on Sunday certainly had their differences: different grades, different hometowns, different majors, different interests, different friendships and even different worldviews, but they all had a few things in common: their Lasallian ties and a love of the Philadelphia Eagles. This aspect of finding community and commonality among differences is something that truly upholds the pillars of Lasallian identity of the spirit of faith, zeal for service and communion in mission. This might be a stretch but La Salle students have faith in their team, a zeal to help out people along the way by helping other students navigate the subway system for example and a commission in the mission of coming together to support a common goal. 

 As students walked back to campus together and everyone parted their ways for the night, students exchanged “good-nights,” “be-safes” and “Go Birds.” In Philadelphia, “Go Birds” means a few different things like “have a good day/night,” “you’re the best” and even “I love you.” While from an outside perspective this may sound like some sports community fantasy, the spirit of the Lasallian and Philadelphian community was alive and well on Sunday evening. 

Editor’s Note: Go Birds! 

So, what did you miss?

News

Kylie McGovern, Editor 

via La Salle University

La Salle students began coming back to campus for the spring semester on Saturday Jan. 15. But a lot goes on during the winter break both at La Salle University and in the City of Philadelphia. So, here is a roundup of what you might have missed while away on break. 

  1. La Salle University hosted the winter open house on Monday, Jan. 16, 2023 at 9:30 AM until 2:00 PM. The event was for high school prospective students and transfer students. The open house consisted of an opening session, admission and financial aid information, academic sessions, campus tours, and lunch. Following the Open House, visitors were invited to the Men’s Basketball Game against Saint Joseph’s University.
  2. Students at La Salle celebrated Martin Luther King day on campus and off campus on Jan.  16. UMASS hosted NETWORK which is a lobbying group composed of nuns to discuss radical love and social justice training. Basketball teams, swimming teams and track and field teams visited local Logan elementary school for a day of service to honor the memory and impact of Dr. King. 
  3. Classes began on Tuesday Jan. 17 kicking off the spring semester. Feb. 3 is the last day to file a pass/fail option for spring full semester classes. 
  4. The MacCready Family Foundation donated $100,000 to the University’s Department of Psychology and its clinical psychology program. This grant will go towards serving mental health needs in the area around La Salle University. 
  5. On Jan. 21, the Philadelphia Eagles advanced in the playoffs after victory against the New York Giants. Late Night La Salle hosted a viewing of the game and a spirit of brotherly love entered the campus. 
  6. A new semester is the time to get involved on campus. La Salle’s recreation center hosted intramural basketball registration on Jan. 23rd. In addition to recreation, the involvement fair will be held on Jan. 26 from 12:00 pm until 2:00 pm. The involvement fair is an opportunity for students to receive information about clubs on campus as well as employment opportunities. In addition, panhellenic recruitment begins on Feb. 2. 
  7. Wellness Wednesdays return again this semester.  Public Health Capstone Students will host a game of Wheel of Consent to teach students about the importance of gaining consent. In addition, the Public Health Capstone students will discuss racial stressors and how to overcome these stressors from 1:00 PM until 2:00 PM in the Union Lobby. 

Editor’s Note: These are just a few of the happenings over winter break at the beginning of the semester. If you are interested in the La Salle Collegian highlighting your organization’s events in a News story or press please contact mcgovernk8@lasalle.edu. Best of luck during this semester, Explorers.

Successful Giving Tuesday at La Salle

News

Kylie McGovern, Editor 

On Tuesday, Nov. 29 La Salle raised a record-breaking number of donations at over $180,000 through 678 gifts. Giving Tuesday is a global day of giving or a global generosity movement which is held each year on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving. Giving Tuesday efforts here at La Salle prioritized the year-long charter challenge President Allen launched at his inauguration. La Salle University describes the charter challenge as a “$10 million fundraising initiative [that] will elevate our University’s academic and overall campus experiences for both our current and future Explorers. We are on our way toward achieving this ambitious goal, now [having] raised more than $6 million.” Giving Tuesday efforts towards the charter challenge supported an array of causes like the La Salle Fund for Student Scholarships, the President’s Strategic Initiative Fund, the Honors Program Scholarship Initiative, the School of Arts and Sciences Fund, the School of Business Fund, the School of Nursing and Health Sciences Fund and Explorer Fund for Athletics. 

The La Salle Fund focuses on helping La Salle maintain its mission of providing accessible and transformative education for students through scholarship and financial aid. Similarly, The 1863 Achievement Scholarship makes the gap between institutional funding and a student’s financial resources disappear. Donors will support an incoming first-year, resident student for all four years of their La Salle career. The charter challenge also seeks to raise funds for The Honors Program Scholarship Initiative which aims to attract and retain high-achieving students at La Salle University. 

 President Daniel Allen uses the President’s Strategic Initiative Fund to allocate funding to support initiatives that make a La Sallian education more accessible for all students while providing programs to prepare La Salle students with skills to bring to their careers. 

Each of the schools here at La Salle: Arts and Sciences, Business and Nursing and Health Sciences receive funding from the charter challenge. And finally, gifts to the Explorer Fund went towards different areas of athletics like nutrition, travel and equipment. 

Overall, Giving Tuesday raised a substantial amount of gifts that will go back into La Salle University for the students here today and in the future. 

What’s A La Soulmate?

Editorial

Kylie McGovern, Managing Editor

Merriam-Webster defines a soulmate as a person who is perfectly suited to another in temperament. In my time at La Salle, I had heard the term “La Soulmates” thrown around. A ‘La Soulmate’ is a person perfectly suited for another person who they met here at 20th and Olney. In hearing this term I realized that I already knew two La Soulmates: my parents.

 My parents met while working right here on campus at Germantown Hospital in the 90s. My mom was in nursing school and my dad was on the men’s rowing team and studied biology. My dad graduated in 1993 and he and my mom have created a life right outside of Philadelphia for the past thirty years. They got married in 1999 and I came along in 2001. My two sisters were born in 2003 and 2005. La Salle remained a special place for my parents as they reconnected with friends from La Salle over the years. But, in 2020 when I chose to come to my parents’ alma mater and my sister followed this past year La Salle became an even more centric part of our lives. 

In talking to friends here at La Salle, my parents’ La Soulmate story is special, but not unique. Many of my friends here have siblings or parents who are also La Soulmates. As a semester-long project here at the La Salle Collegian, I was lucky enough to connect with La Soulmates. These La Soulmates have various stories for how they met each other ranging from class to Greek life, to mutual friends, but one aspect that seems to be a player in all of these stories is the tight-knit community. Without further adieu, here are some stories from La Soulmates I connected with: 

Crista Bernardino explains that she and her husband Brad met at La Salle in 2010 when he was a freshman rushing Alpha Phi Delta and she was a junior in Gamma Phi Beta. The two were paired together at a social event and ran into one another a few months later at Finnegan’s Wake and have been together ever since. Today, the two have been married for over 6 years and have a son and daughter.

Justine Amorose and Sean Ford have a similar Greek love story. The two met in the fall of their freshman year while Justine studied nursing and was a member of Alpha Theta Alpha and Sean a member of Alpha Pi Delta. The two graduated in May 2021 and have been together for nearly five years.   

Other La Soulmates met through student organizations like Amanda Hicken and her husband Scott who met through the Masque. The two were friends for several years and then started dating Scott’s senior year. The two earned the Masque’s first ‘It’s About F*ing Time’ award at that year’s formal. Amanda and Scott have been married since 2009 and now live in Cleveland, Ohio with their daughter Amelia.

Johanna Szyszkiewicz met her fiance Joe while Joe was in the four-year MBA program and she was in the nursing program. The two met very briefly at a social for the Ambassadors but had a more official introduction at a Rugby social a few weeks later. The two love to enjoy the Eagles together today in between Johanna’s nursing shifts. 

The classroom here at La Salle brought other La Soulmates like Mary and Brad Himmelstein who met in statistics class, but also connected through peer educators and work-study. It’s a small school, right? The Himmelsteins’ got engaged their senior year and will celebrate their 15th wedding anniversary this year. 

 Kaitlyn (Petruccelli) Murphy and James Murphy met in the classroom like the Himmelstein. The two shared their classes together freshman year as biology majors in the same Honors Triple. Kaitlyn explained that “after everyone did poorly on our first history test with Dr. Stowe, Jimmy showed up at my dorm room with another classmate, looking to study with me. We subsequently formed a study group with four other bio majors in the Honors Program – we all studied together through four years at La Salle, including MCAT prep.” Jimmy and Kaitlyn stayed friends and study buddies until their junior year when they took physics when we started spending more time together. The two started dating at the end of that year. La Salle remains a role in the couple’s life recently as Br. Michael McGuinness attended their wedding last year and gave a homily at their nuptial mass. The two explained how Lasallian values shape their lives today in their careers in medicine. The two welcomed a baby boy this past summer. 

For some couples like Christina Potter and Marcus Jackson, La Salle strengthens their relationship from a pre-existing one. The two met at West Catholic High School, in senior year, a month before either told the other they were going to La Salle. They both ended up going to La Salle, where they stayed together all four years and are now married! The two said that “La Salle definitely helped us to grow and ‘explore’ our relationship!”

Chris and Melanie Idler both graduated in 1993. Melanie remembers seeing Chris in her freshman orientation in the summer before school started and was definitely hoping to run into him freshman year. But, Chris told me a story about how he remembered meeting Melanie saying “​​she was wearing two different color shoes, which I thought was a little odd, but it caught my eye.” The two disconnected for a while after school, but both were in Philly the same weekend without knowing it. Melanie ran into a friend from La Salle on the banks of the Schuylkill River that weekend who mentioned he was having a party that evening. Melanie and her friends ended up turning up at that friend’s house in Manayunk, where Chris happened to be. Today, Lasallian values play a part in the Idlers’ lives as they send their two daughters to a Christian Brothers high school in Washington, D.C. (St. John’s College High School) , one of which applied to La Salle for the class of 2027. 

Although these are just a few stories of La Soulmates, these love stories are a testament to the community and friendship that exists on campus. Personally, my life would be different without La Salle literally because my parents met here, but also emotionally because of the community this campus sows. I would like to extend my gratitude to all of the La Soulmates who reached out, even those who were not included. In addition, thank you to Cherylyn Rush and Brother Michael who helped connect me to the La Soulmates. 

Successful Giving Tuesday at La Salle

News

Kylie McGovern, Editor 

On Tuesday, Nov. 29 La Salle raised a record-breaking number of donations at over $180,000 through 678 gifts. Giving Tuesday is a global day of giving or a global generosity movement which is held each year on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving. Giving Tuesday efforts here at La Salle prioritized the year-long charter challenge President Allen launched at his inauguration. La Salle University describes the charter challenge as a “$10 million fundraising initiative [that] will elevate our University’s academic and overall campus experiences for both our current and future Explorers. We are on our way toward achieving this ambitious goal, now [having] raised more than $6 million.” Giving Tuesday efforts towards the charter challenge supported an array of causes like the La Salle Fund for Student Scholarships, the President’s Strategic Initiative Fund, the Honors Program Scholarship Initiative, the School of Arts and Sciences Fund, the School of Business Fund, the School of Nursing and Health Sciences Fund and Explorer Fund for Athletics. 

The La Salle Fund focuses on helping La Salle maintain its mission of providing accessible and transformative education for students through scholarship and financial aid. Similarly, The 1863 Achievement Scholarship makes the gap between institutional funding and a student’s financial resources disappear. Donors will support an incoming first-year, resident student for all four years of their La Salle career. The charter challenge also seeks to raise funds for The Honors Program Scholarship Initiative which aims to attract and retain high-achieving students at La Salle University. 

 President Daniel Allen uses the President’s Strategic Initiative Fund to allocate funding to support initiatives that make a La Sallian education more accessible for all students while providing programs to prepare La Salle students with skills to bring to their careers. 

Each of the schools here at La Salle: Arts and Sciences, Business and Nursing and Health Sciences receive funding from the charter challenge. And finally, gifts to the Explorer Fund went towards different areas of athletics like nutrition, travel and equipment. 

Overall, Giving Tuesday raised a substantial amount of gifts that will go back into La Salle University for the students here today and in the future. 

The City of Philadelphia and La Salle students support refugees arriving in Philadelphia 

News

Kylie McGovern, Editor 

On Nov. 15, 28 refugees from El Paso, TX arrived at 30th Street Station in Philadelphia. La Salle Alum and Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney explained that the City of Brotherly Love will accept these migrants with open arms. He explained, “we’ve welcomed tens of thousands of Afghans, and Ukrainians, and if you go back into our city’s history, every ethnic group that is here came as refugees for the most part, and these folks are no different…we have human dignity, decency, and the responsibility to make their transition as smooth as possible, that’s what this country is all about.” When these migrants arrived at 30th Street they were greeted with a SEPTA bus, food, water and healthcare if necessary. 

On Monday, Nov. 20, more migrants arrived in Philadelphia. This time, 46 people seeking asylum arrived after their 40-hour journey. Advocates explain that these migrants who got off the bus are in the asylum process and not breaking any rules regarding immigration/refugee procedures.

Although various organizations and advocacy groups are committed to helping migrants arriving in Philadelphia, this sentiment extends to the classroom here at La Salle University in a Communication and Culture class which focuses on the reciprocal link between communication and culture by examining how communication practices create, reflect, and maintain cultures, as well as how culture influences communication practice. Recently, Katie Dunleavy, Ph.D. ‘s Communication and Culture class completed an assignment that entailed writing a letter to an elected official on behalf of a micro-culture about a certain issue. These micro-cultures ranged from various groups like homelessness, people with disabilities and refugees. Many students decided to write on behalf of refugees in various cities. This assignment entailed both a written letter to an elected official and a presentation. In this presentation, students took various approaches to explain the importance of the issue. Some explained the data regarding how sanctuary cities help the arriving migrants, while others related to the issue on a more personal level by explaining similar situations either they went through or family members experienced. After the assignments were complete, Dunleavy provided feedback to students and encouraged them to send their advocacy letters to the elected officials they wrote to. Overall, both the City of Philadelphia and La Salle University students are in tune with supporting arriving refugees.

La Salle Homecoming weekend 

News

Kylie McGovern, Editor

La Salle University’s family and homecoming weekend began on Friday Nov. 11 with events all over campus for different groups at La Salle to enjoy. Treetops Cafe welcomed families for a family dinner on Friday night at 5 p.m. In addition, La Salle University hosted the Alumni Association Awards which are held each year. This year’s award ceremony,  hosted in Founders’ Hall, honored Br. Gerard F. Molyneaux, ’58, M.A. ’59, FSC, Ph.D. with the John J. Finley, ’24 Award for his tireless volunteer work and support of La Salle. In addition, the Alumni association also presented the Signum Fidei Medal, to Liguori Academy.

In addition, La Salle’s Swimming and Diving hosted a Tri-meet on Friday evening. In addition to athletics other talents of La Salle’s students were on display during homecoming as the Masque performed their production of Drop Dead. This production was performed throughout the weekend and following the show on Saturday many joined Late Night La Salle for an after-show party in the lounge. 

The homecoming activities continued into Sat. with a block party on 20th. The block party was a free event with entertainment, food trucks and drink options. Students, alumni, faculty and families sprinkled the street while enjoying food, friendship, music and fun until the 3 p.m. men’s basketball game. 

The La Salle Explorers defeated the Wagner Seahawks with a 77-69 lead. This student section was packed and electric this Saturday afternoon. The pep band, dance team and cheerleading team kept this energy alive throughout the game. Head over to our sports section to read more about the game. Following the basketball win, fans headed to Deke’s BBQ for Post Game Happy Hour. 

Sunday Morning began with mass celebrated in the De La Salle chapel by Father Frank. Students and alumni read and brought up the collection during mass. In addition, two seniors Trevor and Frankie spoke about what family and the La Salle community meant to them. 

Following mass, families and students were welcomed to family brunch at treetops dining hall. Students could use meal plans for brunch and families paid at the door. Students spent time catching up with their own families while also getting to know their friends’ families. 

Homecoming weekend concluded with the Golden Explorers 50th Reunion tour and dinner. The class of 1972 met on the Hansen Quad and attended a special tour of La Salle’s campus. The tour stopped at the Alumni House and included a view of the 1972 Archives display in Connelly Library. Then, members of the Class of 1972 joined their classmates for cocktails, dinner and commemorative medallion presentation in recognition of their golden anniversary.

Overall, homecoming weekend was a chance for all members of the La Salle community to enjoy a beautiful day on campus. 

President Allen’s Inauguration

News

Kylie McGovern, Editor

President Daniel J. Allen, Ph.D.’s inauguration weekend began on Thursday, Oct. 27 with mass at the Miraculous Medal Shrine just a few minutes away from La Salle. Mass was celebrated by our very own Father Frank, and La Salle students participated in mass by singing in the choir, being altar servers, reading and handing out programs. In addition to students, there were La Sallian brothers, parents, Dr. Allen’s family and alumni in attendance. After mass, there was a reception in Founders Hall where attendees mingled.

The next morning the official inauguration ceremony began at 10:00 a.m. A live stream recording is available on Facebook. Provost Shivanthi Anandan, Ph.D. opened the ceremony with a few words about the importance of a university’s presidential inauguration and introduced Brother Robert Shieler, FSC who is the former superior general of the brothers of the Christian schools. Then, Brother Robert Shieler offered an invocation for the ceremony. Following this prayerful invocation, Anandan offered a thank you to president emeritus Brother Michael McGuiness, FSC, Ph.D. for the leadership he provides to the university. 

Chair of the Board of Trustees of La Salle University Ellen Reilly then offered her thoughts to the university and Dr. Allen. Reilly discusses her time at LA Salle, its 160-year history, and the future  to be explored through the leadership of Dr. Allen. The archbishop of Philadelphia Nelson Perez offered a written greeting and later celebrated mass on Sunday. Sister Mary Persico IHM Ed.D, president of Marywood University, brought greetings on behalf of our commonwealth institutions. Various other notable individuals including State senator Art Haywood, Philadelphia mayor and La Salle graduate Jim Kenney, Victoria Ketz, Ph.D. president of the faculty senate, dean of students TiRease Holmes, MBA, Robert. and Christine Mancini, parents of four la salle students/alumni, and Joseph Markmann Ph.D., MBA, president of the alumni association. 

Then a video of students was shared during the inauguration. Students in this video offered congratulations, personal anecdotes, excitement, and messages of hope to Dr. Allen. Following this video, Student Government Association president Michaela Craner offered a greeting to Dr. Allen as well. 

James Collins, president of Loras College which is Dr. Allen’s alma mater, formally introduced Dr. Allen as La Salle’s 30th president. Collins shared stories of his relationship with Dr. Allen while he was in college from his time playing college basketball to his meeting his wife. 

Finally, Dr. Allen opened his speech with a joke about shooting three-pointers and continued with a light-hearted but genuine speech. Dr. Allen then pivoted to a more emotional and serious thank you to Collins. Dr. Allen continued to encourage the community to embrace the unknown while thanking the people around them. Dr. Allen then thanked some of these special people in attendance. Allen reflected on his catholic education that began when he was in first grade and continued through each of the degrees he received. Allen spoke about his call to come to La Salle as well as St. John Baptist de la Salle’s call to educate. President Allen then discussed a few goals of La Salle University and hope for a successful future for the community and students including discussions of new graduate degree programs and the launch of the $10 million initiative called the Charter Challenge. La Salle students were extremely. Ending his speech in a light-hearted, but kind way like how he began, Dr. Allen put on a Philadelphia Phillies hat. 

The inauguration ceremony ended with a closing prayer by brother James Gaffney and the alma mater. The La Salle Community then enjoyed a celebration on the Hansen Quad with music and lunch. On Sunday evening, Archbishop Perez celebrated mass in the day la salle chapel to end the weekend. 

Editor’s note: I would be remiss to not offer my personal excitement and congratulations to Dr. Allen. I wish Dr. Allen both success and the best of luck in this role. I hope he continues to find this LaSallian community here the way I and so many others have. I have been lucky enough to have spoken with Dr. Allen a few times and I can truly tell he is a Lasallian and will do great things for this community. 

Dean of the school of Arts and Sciences plans to step down from her position in July 2023

News
Pamela E. Barnett, Ph.D. via La Salle University

Kylie McGovern, Editor 

On Wednesday, Oct. 19, President Daniel J. Allen, Ph.D. announced via email that Dr. Pamela Barnett, Ph.D. who is the current Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences plans to step down from her position in July 2023. Barnett has given La Salle 5 years of service as the Dean since her arrival in 2018.

 Barnett’s time and success here at La Salle can be chronicled by accomplishments like the addition of new academic programs like the master’s degree of Social Work, the bachelor’s degree of Science in Actuarial Science, as well as minors in Translational Science and Black Studies. In her time as Dean, Barnett also implemented community building within the school like the addition of faculty retreats, faculty learning communities, and increased faculty diversity. Additionally, Barnett increased grants sought and received within the School of Arts and Sciences. Although replacing a leader like Barnett will be challenging, The Provost’s office will update the La Salle Community in November about the logistics of the search process for a new Dean of Arts and Sciences.

After she concludes her time in July 2023, Barnett hopes to return to La Salle in a new role as an English professor. In addition, Barnett also wants to teach classes in the new black studies minor. After receiving degrees from Barnard and Emory University, Barnett began her career teaching at various colleges like American University and The University of South Carolina. Before coming to La Salle University, she worked as Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences while teaching English at Trinity Washington University in Washington, DC. These experiences propelled Barnett into her role at La Salle and allowed her to use her talents in research, writing, inclusivity, and organization in these roles to which La Salle and the staff at the collegian are grateful. A Senior writer here at the Collegian, Nya Griffin explains that Barnett “will be missed deeply as Dean of A & S, and I will miss her strength in office as a woman and showing women on campus that we can do it!” 

Editor’s note: As an Arts and Science student I wish to extend both my gratitude and congratulations to Dean Barnett. I personally love seeing female leadership here at La Salle and think that both the diversity/inclusivity and financial work Dean Barnett has done during her time will create posterity for the school of A&S. I would love to take a class with Barnett if she joins the English department. 

The scariest thing this Halloween 

Commentary
via City of Philadelphia

Kylie McGovern, Editor 

Ghosts, ghouls, vampires, and witches are not nearly as scary to me as some of the voting apathy I have experienced recently. Polyas.com defines voting apathy as “a lack of interest in participating in elections by certain groups of voters. One side-effect of voter apathy can be low voter turnout on election day if voting is non-compulsory. In countries or areas with compulsory elections, voter apathy may manifest itself in the form of a high proportion of spoilt ballots or donkey votes.” I have experienced this spirit (get it, cause it’s Halloween) of voting apathy with haunting phrases like “I am anti-vote” or when asked if registered to vote someone said, “like for president?” Seriously spooky. 

So, why vote? My simple and perhaps pessimistic answer is that voting is the last shred of democracy we have left. Look, America’s democratic system is far from perfect, the nine arguably most powerful individuals are APPOINTED for LIFE and maybe some senators have been serving since the ‘80s, but voting in all elections every year (yes, even the ones that happen in May and in years without a presidential election) local elections can actually massively impact your lives and neighborhoods. 

If using your address here at La Salle, national, state, and local offices are up for the vote this election. A PA senator seat is up for election. If you have been lucky or unlucky enough to see a scary political ad you’d know that John Fetterman (yes, the one who wears hoodies) and Mehmet Oz (that one TV doctor) are the main competitors although others are also running. In addition, PA governor is up for election. Josh Shapiro runs for the democrat party and Douglas V. Mastriano runs as the republican candidate. In addition, PA lieutenant governor is up for election. Although I do certainly think it is important to vote in these elections. I think it is immensely important to vote in local elections which are also on the ballot. If using your La Salle address, you have the opportunity to vote for the Philadelphia City Council: drafts, debates, and enacts legislation that exclusively impacts the city of Philadelphia. City council also plans city finances which essentially decides where your tax dollars go. This allocation of taxes can go to repave the roads or programs at public schools AKA things that can directly impact you. The council also “has the authority to decide who sits on various city boards and commissions. As a result, the City Council has significant influence in shaping city policies and programs” according to Committee of Seventy. Ultimately, these local elections have the opportunity to make tangible change in my opinion and to me your vote goes a lot farther in these local elections during “off years.” So, now that I hopefully have convinced you about the importance of voting, you can register to vote following this link, although it will be too late to register to vote on Nov. 8, I hope I’ve convinced you to vote in the next election in May 2023.  Please vote. The future can be scary, and I am not talking about in a The Sixth Sense way. The future is rather scary because  2021 was the warmest year ever recorded, there have been 35 school shootings in the US, and social media is derailing democracy with misinformation. I think that voting maybe won’t solve all of these issues, but it might elect some people who will take a crack at making a better tomorrow for you. See you at the polls on Nov. 8, 2022, from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.