La Salle Univeristy students celebrate Eagles victory

News

Kylie McGovern, Editor

One could feel the nervousness and tension on the afternoon of Jan. 29 on La Salle University’s campus before the Philadelphia Eagles game commenced. Students gathered to watch the game both on and off campus. The Philadelphia Eagles defeated the San Francisco 49ers 31-7 which won the Birds not only the NFC Championship but also a spot in the Super Bowl. 

Around campus, there were lots of cheers and  excitement which continued throughout the evening. La Salle Students flocked to the Olney Transportation Center just a few minutes away from campus to head downtown and celebrate the win with the greater community in the City of Brotherly Love. 

Hugs and High fives were exchanged in the station, as well as upward to ten repeats of the Eagles fight song. Many La Salle Students got off the Broad Street Line at the City Hall stop to join their fellow Philadelphians in the heart of the city. Fireworks painted the sky and the music of rappers from Philadelphia filled the air with a spirit of hope and community. This spirit of hope seems to be a quintessential part of being a Philadelphia sports fan, but the spirit of community is a quintessential part of being Lasallian. 

Although these celebrations of sports victory seem fairly surface level, riding back up to campus with fellow students, some who knew each other well and others who were practically strangers, showed a deeper meaning of community. Everyone celebrating on Sunday certainly had their differences: different grades, different hometowns, different majors, different interests, different friendships and even different worldviews, but they all had a few things in common: their Lasallian ties and a love of the Philadelphia Eagles. This aspect of finding community and commonality among differences is something that truly upholds the pillars of Lasallian identity of the spirit of faith, zeal for service and communion in mission. This might be a stretch but La Salle students have faith in their team, a zeal to help out people along the way by helping other students navigate the subway system for example and a commission in the mission of coming together to support a common goal. 

 As students walked back to campus together and everyone parted their ways for the night, students exchanged “good-nights,” “be-safes” and “Go Birds.” In Philadelphia, “Go Birds” means a few different things like “have a good day/night,” “you’re the best” and even “I love you.” While from an outside perspective this may sound like some sports community fantasy, the spirit of the Lasallian and Philadelphian community was alive and well on Sunday evening. 

Editor’s Note: Go Birds! 

So, what did you miss?

News

Kylie McGovern, Editor 

via La Salle University

La Salle students began coming back to campus for the spring semester on Saturday Jan. 15. But a lot goes on during the winter break both at La Salle University and in the City of Philadelphia. So, here is a roundup of what you might have missed while away on break. 

  1. La Salle University hosted the winter open house on Monday, Jan. 16, 2023 at 9:30 AM until 2:00 PM. The event was for high school prospective students and transfer students. The open house consisted of an opening session, admission and financial aid information, academic sessions, campus tours, and lunch. Following the Open House, visitors were invited to the Men’s Basketball Game against Saint Joseph’s University.
  2. Students at La Salle celebrated Martin Luther King day on campus and off campus on Jan.  16. UMASS hosted NETWORK which is a lobbying group composed of nuns to discuss radical love and social justice training. Basketball teams, swimming teams and track and field teams visited local Logan elementary school for a day of service to honor the memory and impact of Dr. King. 
  3. Classes began on Tuesday Jan. 17 kicking off the spring semester. Feb. 3 is the last day to file a pass/fail option for spring full semester classes. 
  4. The MacCready Family Foundation donated $100,000 to the University’s Department of Psychology and its clinical psychology program. This grant will go towards serving mental health needs in the area around La Salle University. 
  5. On Jan. 21, the Philadelphia Eagles advanced in the playoffs after victory against the New York Giants. Late Night La Salle hosted a viewing of the game and a spirit of brotherly love entered the campus. 
  6. A new semester is the time to get involved on campus. La Salle’s recreation center hosted intramural basketball registration on Jan. 23rd. In addition to recreation, the involvement fair will be held on Jan. 26 from 12:00 pm until 2:00 pm. The involvement fair is an opportunity for students to receive information about clubs on campus as well as employment opportunities. In addition, panhellenic recruitment begins on Feb. 2. 
  7. Wellness Wednesdays return again this semester.  Public Health Capstone Students will host a game of Wheel of Consent to teach students about the importance of gaining consent. In addition, the Public Health Capstone students will discuss racial stressors and how to overcome these stressors from 1:00 PM until 2:00 PM in the Union Lobby. 

Editor’s Note: These are just a few of the happenings over winter break at the beginning of the semester. If you are interested in the La Salle Collegian highlighting your organization’s events in a News story or press please contact mcgovernk8@lasalle.edu. Best of luck during this semester, Explorers.

Successful Giving Tuesday at La Salle

News

Kylie McGovern, Editor 

On Tuesday, Nov. 29 La Salle raised a record-breaking number of donations at over $180,000 through 678 gifts. Giving Tuesday is a global day of giving or a global generosity movement which is held each year on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving. Giving Tuesday efforts here at La Salle prioritized the year-long charter challenge President Allen launched at his inauguration. La Salle University describes the charter challenge as a “$10 million fundraising initiative [that] will elevate our University’s academic and overall campus experiences for both our current and future Explorers. We are on our way toward achieving this ambitious goal, now [having] raised more than $6 million.” Giving Tuesday efforts towards the charter challenge supported an array of causes like the La Salle Fund for Student Scholarships, the President’s Strategic Initiative Fund, the Honors Program Scholarship Initiative, the School of Arts and Sciences Fund, the School of Business Fund, the School of Nursing and Health Sciences Fund and Explorer Fund for Athletics. 

The La Salle Fund focuses on helping La Salle maintain its mission of providing accessible and transformative education for students through scholarship and financial aid. Similarly, The 1863 Achievement Scholarship makes the gap between institutional funding and a student’s financial resources disappear. Donors will support an incoming first-year, resident student for all four years of their La Salle career. The charter challenge also seeks to raise funds for The Honors Program Scholarship Initiative which aims to attract and retain high-achieving students at La Salle University. 

 President Daniel Allen uses the President’s Strategic Initiative Fund to allocate funding to support initiatives that make a La Sallian education more accessible for all students while providing programs to prepare La Salle students with skills to bring to their careers. 

Each of the schools here at La Salle: Arts and Sciences, Business and Nursing and Health Sciences receive funding from the charter challenge. And finally, gifts to the Explorer Fund went towards different areas of athletics like nutrition, travel and equipment. 

Overall, Giving Tuesday raised a substantial amount of gifts that will go back into La Salle University for the students here today and in the future. 

Successful Giving Tuesday at La Salle

News

Kylie McGovern, Editor 

On Tuesday, Nov. 29 La Salle raised a record-breaking number of donations at over $180,000 through 678 gifts. Giving Tuesday is a global day of giving or a global generosity movement which is held each year on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving. Giving Tuesday efforts here at La Salle prioritized the year-long charter challenge President Allen launched at his inauguration. La Salle University describes the charter challenge as a “$10 million fundraising initiative [that] will elevate our University’s academic and overall campus experiences for both our current and future Explorers. We are on our way toward achieving this ambitious goal, now [having] raised more than $6 million.” Giving Tuesday efforts towards the charter challenge supported an array of causes like the La Salle Fund for Student Scholarships, the President’s Strategic Initiative Fund, the Honors Program Scholarship Initiative, the School of Arts and Sciences Fund, the School of Business Fund, the School of Nursing and Health Sciences Fund and Explorer Fund for Athletics. 

The La Salle Fund focuses on helping La Salle maintain its mission of providing accessible and transformative education for students through scholarship and financial aid. Similarly, The 1863 Achievement Scholarship makes the gap between institutional funding and a student’s financial resources disappear. Donors will support an incoming first-year, resident student for all four years of their La Salle career. The charter challenge also seeks to raise funds for The Honors Program Scholarship Initiative which aims to attract and retain high-achieving students at La Salle University. 

 President Daniel Allen uses the President’s Strategic Initiative Fund to allocate funding to support initiatives that make a La Sallian education more accessible for all students while providing programs to prepare La Salle students with skills to bring to their careers. 

Each of the schools here at La Salle: Arts and Sciences, Business and Nursing and Health Sciences receive funding from the charter challenge. And finally, gifts to the Explorer Fund went towards different areas of athletics like nutrition, travel and equipment. 

Overall, Giving Tuesday raised a substantial amount of gifts that will go back into La Salle University for the students here today and in the future. 

The City of Philadelphia and La Salle students support refugees arriving in Philadelphia 

News

Kylie McGovern, Editor 

On Nov. 15, 28 refugees from El Paso, TX arrived at 30th Street Station in Philadelphia. La Salle Alum and Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney explained that the City of Brotherly Love will accept these migrants with open arms. He explained, “we’ve welcomed tens of thousands of Afghans, and Ukrainians, and if you go back into our city’s history, every ethnic group that is here came as refugees for the most part, and these folks are no different…we have human dignity, decency, and the responsibility to make their transition as smooth as possible, that’s what this country is all about.” When these migrants arrived at 30th Street they were greeted with a SEPTA bus, food, water and healthcare if necessary. 

On Monday, Nov. 20, more migrants arrived in Philadelphia. This time, 46 people seeking asylum arrived after their 40-hour journey. Advocates explain that these migrants who got off the bus are in the asylum process and not breaking any rules regarding immigration/refugee procedures.

Although various organizations and advocacy groups are committed to helping migrants arriving in Philadelphia, this sentiment extends to the classroom here at La Salle University in a Communication and Culture class which focuses on the reciprocal link between communication and culture by examining how communication practices create, reflect, and maintain cultures, as well as how culture influences communication practice. Recently, Katie Dunleavy, Ph.D. ‘s Communication and Culture class completed an assignment that entailed writing a letter to an elected official on behalf of a micro-culture about a certain issue. These micro-cultures ranged from various groups like homelessness, people with disabilities and refugees. Many students decided to write on behalf of refugees in various cities. This assignment entailed both a written letter to an elected official and a presentation. In this presentation, students took various approaches to explain the importance of the issue. Some explained the data regarding how sanctuary cities help the arriving migrants, while others related to the issue on a more personal level by explaining similar situations either they went through or family members experienced. After the assignments were complete, Dunleavy provided feedback to students and encouraged them to send their advocacy letters to the elected officials they wrote to. Overall, both the City of Philadelphia and La Salle University students are in tune with supporting arriving refugees.

La Salle Homecoming weekend 

News

Kylie McGovern, Editor

La Salle University’s family and homecoming weekend began on Friday Nov. 11 with events all over campus for different groups at La Salle to enjoy. Treetops Cafe welcomed families for a family dinner on Friday night at 5 p.m. In addition, La Salle University hosted the Alumni Association Awards which are held each year. This year’s award ceremony,  hosted in Founders’ Hall, honored Br. Gerard F. Molyneaux, ’58, M.A. ’59, FSC, Ph.D. with the John J. Finley, ’24 Award for his tireless volunteer work and support of La Salle. In addition, the Alumni association also presented the Signum Fidei Medal, to Liguori Academy.

In addition, La Salle’s Swimming and Diving hosted a Tri-meet on Friday evening. In addition to athletics other talents of La Salle’s students were on display during homecoming as the Masque performed their production of Drop Dead. This production was performed throughout the weekend and following the show on Saturday many joined Late Night La Salle for an after-show party in the lounge. 

The homecoming activities continued into Sat. with a block party on 20th. The block party was a free event with entertainment, food trucks and drink options. Students, alumni, faculty and families sprinkled the street while enjoying food, friendship, music and fun until the 3 p.m. men’s basketball game. 

The La Salle Explorers defeated the Wagner Seahawks with a 77-69 lead. This student section was packed and electric this Saturday afternoon. The pep band, dance team and cheerleading team kept this energy alive throughout the game. Head over to our sports section to read more about the game. Following the basketball win, fans headed to Deke’s BBQ for Post Game Happy Hour. 

Sunday Morning began with mass celebrated in the De La Salle chapel by Father Frank. Students and alumni read and brought up the collection during mass. In addition, two seniors Trevor and Frankie spoke about what family and the La Salle community meant to them. 

Following mass, families and students were welcomed to family brunch at treetops dining hall. Students could use meal plans for brunch and families paid at the door. Students spent time catching up with their own families while also getting to know their friends’ families. 

Homecoming weekend concluded with the Golden Explorers 50th Reunion tour and dinner. The class of 1972 met on the Hansen Quad and attended a special tour of La Salle’s campus. The tour stopped at the Alumni House and included a view of the 1972 Archives display in Connelly Library. Then, members of the Class of 1972 joined their classmates for cocktails, dinner and commemorative medallion presentation in recognition of their golden anniversary.

Overall, homecoming weekend was a chance for all members of the La Salle community to enjoy a beautiful day on campus. 

Fetterman, Shapiro, Biden, and Obama Visit North Philadelphia for Mid-Term Election Season

News

Mia Mattingly and Andrew Plunkett, Staff

via WHYY

On Sat. Nov 6, La Salle Students were fortunate enough to attend the Philadelphia grassroots event at Temple University’s Liacouras Center. Here, they spent their afternoon hearing from local, state, and federal leaders discuss the Democratic Party and their beliefs this election season. Some of these political leaders included La Salle alumni State Rep. Joanna McClinton and Rep. Dwight Evans, Lieutenant Governor candidate Austin Davis, current Governor Tom Wolf, incumbent Senator Bob Casey, and many other prominent leaders of the Democratic Party. A common trend among the speeches was the main goals for this midterm election. These include: creating pro-choice policies, funding public education, allowing the unionization of workers, combatting gun violence, and ensuring democracy for the future of our country.

While there are several tight races across the nation, Pennsylvania is again at the center of the political world. In the race for United States Senate, John Fetterman hopes to solidify a Democratic majority in the Senate over Republican Dr. Memhet Oz. The campaign between the two has been tight and has featured a ruthless political advertising campaign. Fetterman has criticized Oz’s allegiance to the commonwealth and personal character, while Oz has labeled Fetterman as a radical liberal and has attacked his health following a stroke Fetterman suffered this summer. Consequently, most polls find that the race is virtually tied heading into election day. 

Democratic Attorney General Josh Shapiro is running against Republican state senator Doug Mastriano at the state level . Mastriano, who was present at the January 6th insurrection and has been recently criticized for his antisemitic comments, faces a severe disadvantage. Shapiro holds a lead over Mastriano in both the polls and fundraising. An article from Penn-Live finds that Shapiro has outspent Mastriano by a margin of 6:1 and a recent Marist poll finds that Shapiro is leading Mastriano by 14 points (54%-40%). Nevertheless, the races in Pennsylvania are some of the most contentious in the country and have caught the eye of political leaders from around the country. 

As such, on Sat., both Democratic and Republican candidates made stops around the state to gain some last-minute traction and votes for their parties up and down the ballot. Mehmet Oz and Doug Mastriano traveled to rurals areas with former-President Donald Trump, where they called for stricter abortion laws and policies that is tougher on crime and immigration. It is also worth noting that Trump was adamant about the past presidential election being “rigged and stolen” and that he does not want to see that happen in Pennsylvania. On the flip side for the Democrats, John Fetterman and Josh Shapiro visited cities like Philadelphia, with President Joe Biden and former President Barack Obama joining them on stage. 

After various state leaders made their case to the crowd, President Biden, former-President Obama, Fetterman, and Shapiro walked out on stage to encourage voters to get out to the polls on Nov. 8. Biden emphasized his legislative accomplishments, including the Inflation Reduction Act and the PACT Act and encouraged the crowd to vote for Fetterman and Shapiro. 

Shapiro promptly followed Biden, who commanded the room and was an engaging and passionate speaker. He emphasized being a governor for all the people of Pennsylvania, not just the ones who voted for him. On top of this, he reiterated the previously mentioned ideologies of the party and vetoed any anti-abortion law that was to come across his desk. 

Fetterman, who recently made headlines for having a stroke, engaged the audience with humor and confidence in his speaking. La Salle students admitted they were nervous to see him speak so publicly. However, the students who attended explained that Fetterman was concise and, quite honestly, if one did not know he had just suffered from a stroke, one would have had no idea by the way he spoke at that rally. In addition to a few zingers about Oz, Fetterman committed himself to protect reproductive rights and being the 51st vote in the United States Senate.  

After Fetterman and Shapiro spoke, Obama echoed Biden’s sentiments and encouraged the crowd to utilize their voices to enact real policy change. He was his usual charismatic self and captivated the room with his public speaking. Obama spoke about the importance of these elections and urged the crowd to get family and friends out to the polls. 

Writers’ Note: 

At the end of the rally, we left with a sense of pride and optimism toward the election. Not only were the candidates passionate about their stances, but the crowd was too. Josh Shapiro stated, “if you show up for me in two days…I’ll fight for you every day these next four years as your Governor,” and this sentiment stuck with us. 

These candidates are running to ensure democracy in our state and country and equality for all, which is something that is worth voting for. So, be sure to head out to the polls and vote on Tue, Nov. 8th, and vote for the future that you want to see, not only in Pennsylvania but in our country. 

President Allen’s Inauguration

News

Kylie McGovern, Editor

President Daniel J. Allen, Ph.D.’s inauguration weekend began on Thursday, Oct. 27 with mass at the Miraculous Medal Shrine just a few minutes away from La Salle. Mass was celebrated by our very own Father Frank, and La Salle students participated in mass by singing in the choir, being altar servers, reading and handing out programs. In addition to students, there were La Sallian brothers, parents, Dr. Allen’s family and alumni in attendance. After mass, there was a reception in Founders Hall where attendees mingled.

The next morning the official inauguration ceremony began at 10:00 a.m. A live stream recording is available on Facebook. Provost Shivanthi Anandan, Ph.D. opened the ceremony with a few words about the importance of a university’s presidential inauguration and introduced Brother Robert Shieler, FSC who is the former superior general of the brothers of the Christian schools. Then, Brother Robert Shieler offered an invocation for the ceremony. Following this prayerful invocation, Anandan offered a thank you to president emeritus Brother Michael McGuiness, FSC, Ph.D. for the leadership he provides to the university. 

Chair of the Board of Trustees of La Salle University Ellen Reilly then offered her thoughts to the university and Dr. Allen. Reilly discusses her time at LA Salle, its 160-year history, and the future  to be explored through the leadership of Dr. Allen. The archbishop of Philadelphia Nelson Perez offered a written greeting and later celebrated mass on Sunday. Sister Mary Persico IHM Ed.D, president of Marywood University, brought greetings on behalf of our commonwealth institutions. Various other notable individuals including State senator Art Haywood, Philadelphia mayor and La Salle graduate Jim Kenney, Victoria Ketz, Ph.D. president of the faculty senate, dean of students TiRease Holmes, MBA, Robert. and Christine Mancini, parents of four la salle students/alumni, and Joseph Markmann Ph.D., MBA, president of the alumni association. 

Then a video of students was shared during the inauguration. Students in this video offered congratulations, personal anecdotes, excitement, and messages of hope to Dr. Allen. Following this video, Student Government Association president Michaela Craner offered a greeting to Dr. Allen as well. 

James Collins, president of Loras College which is Dr. Allen’s alma mater, formally introduced Dr. Allen as La Salle’s 30th president. Collins shared stories of his relationship with Dr. Allen while he was in college from his time playing college basketball to his meeting his wife. 

Finally, Dr. Allen opened his speech with a joke about shooting three-pointers and continued with a light-hearted but genuine speech. Dr. Allen then pivoted to a more emotional and serious thank you to Collins. Dr. Allen continued to encourage the community to embrace the unknown while thanking the people around them. Dr. Allen then thanked some of these special people in attendance. Allen reflected on his catholic education that began when he was in first grade and continued through each of the degrees he received. Allen spoke about his call to come to La Salle as well as St. John Baptist de la Salle’s call to educate. President Allen then discussed a few goals of La Salle University and hope for a successful future for the community and students including discussions of new graduate degree programs and the launch of the $10 million initiative called the Charter Challenge. La Salle students were extremely. Ending his speech in a light-hearted, but kind way like how he began, Dr. Allen put on a Philadelphia Phillies hat. 

The inauguration ceremony ended with a closing prayer by brother James Gaffney and the alma mater. The La Salle Community then enjoyed a celebration on the Hansen Quad with music and lunch. On Sunday evening, Archbishop Perez celebrated mass in the day la salle chapel to end the weekend. 

Editor’s note: I would be remiss to not offer my personal excitement and congratulations to Dr. Allen. I wish Dr. Allen both success and the best of luck in this role. I hope he continues to find this LaSallian community here the way I and so many others have. I have been lucky enough to have spoken with Dr. Allen a few times and I can truly tell he is a Lasallian and will do great things for this community. 

Dean of the school of Arts and Sciences plans to step down from her position in July 2023

News
Pamela E. Barnett, Ph.D. via La Salle University

Kylie McGovern, Editor 

On Wednesday, Oct. 19, President Daniel J. Allen, Ph.D. announced via email that Dr. Pamela Barnett, Ph.D. who is the current Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences plans to step down from her position in July 2023. Barnett has given La Salle 5 years of service as the Dean since her arrival in 2018.

 Barnett’s time and success here at La Salle can be chronicled by accomplishments like the addition of new academic programs like the master’s degree of Social Work, the bachelor’s degree of Science in Actuarial Science, as well as minors in Translational Science and Black Studies. In her time as Dean, Barnett also implemented community building within the school like the addition of faculty retreats, faculty learning communities, and increased faculty diversity. Additionally, Barnett increased grants sought and received within the School of Arts and Sciences. Although replacing a leader like Barnett will be challenging, The Provost’s office will update the La Salle Community in November about the logistics of the search process for a new Dean of Arts and Sciences.

After she concludes her time in July 2023, Barnett hopes to return to La Salle in a new role as an English professor. In addition, Barnett also wants to teach classes in the new black studies minor. After receiving degrees from Barnard and Emory University, Barnett began her career teaching at various colleges like American University and The University of South Carolina. Before coming to La Salle University, she worked as Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences while teaching English at Trinity Washington University in Washington, DC. These experiences propelled Barnett into her role at La Salle and allowed her to use her talents in research, writing, inclusivity, and organization in these roles to which La Salle and the staff at the collegian are grateful. A Senior writer here at the Collegian, Nya Griffin explains that Barnett “will be missed deeply as Dean of A & S, and I will miss her strength in office as a woman and showing women on campus that we can do it!” 

Editor’s note: As an Arts and Science student I wish to extend both my gratitude and congratulations to Dean Barnett. I personally love seeing female leadership here at La Salle and think that both the diversity/inclusivity and financial work Dean Barnett has done during her time will create posterity for the school of A&S. I would love to take a class with Barnett if she joins the English department. 

La Salle hosts COVID-19 booster and flu vaccine clinics

News

Jakob Eiseman, Former Editor-in-Chief

John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

The updated COVID-19 booster is bivalent, meaning it contains components from two different strains.

La Salle University is set to host two on-campus vaccine clinics for members of the La Salle community in the Union Ballroom. It will provide those eligible with the updated COVID-19 boosters as well as this season’s flu shot free of charge. Any member of the La Salle community 18 years or older is eligible to attend. The first clinic will be held Oct. 12 from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., and the second on Wednesday, Oct. 19 from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m.

The clinics will only offer the updated COVID-19 booster to those who received their single dose of the Johnson and Johnson COVID-19 vaccine or their second dose of their Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine series more than two months prior to booster administration. Those who have already received a booster to their COVID-19 vaccination or series, must have received the booster more than two months prior to be eligible for the new booster.

The updated COVID-19 booster is bivalent, meaning it contains material from two strains of the virus. It contains a portion of the original COVID strain that was known to be the cause of the pandemic since March of 2020, as well as a portion of the BA 1 Omicron strain, which was first identified late last year. By most accounts, those who received their original vaccine or series were protected heavily against the symptoms of Omicron, but not entirely from the virus itself. 

This new booster promises to raise immune system protection against COVID-19 and Omicron, as well as bolstering symptom resistance already granted by the original vaccine.

The La Salle University COVID-19 portal’s latest information states that since the beginning of this semester, 75 members of the La Salle community have contracted COVID-19. Continuing to mask, test regularly and shelter in place are still the most effective and simplest ways to stop the spread of COVID-19, but adding a first or second COVID booster to your arsenal is perhaps the best way to protect yourself from the virus.

In addition to COVID boosters, the vaccine clinic will also provide flu vaccines to those who request one. The CDC has stated that “while limited data exist on giving COVID-19 vaccines and other vaccines… experience with giving other vaccines together has shown the way our bodies develop protection and possible side effects are generally similar whether vaccines are given alone or with other vaccines.”

Dr. William Schaffner, professor of preventive medicine and health policy at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine said in an interview with NPR, “If we have a serious influenza season, and if the Omicron variants continue to cause principally mild disease, this coming winter could be a much worse flu season than COVID.” He also said that this could finally be the year that we see the rise of the long-warned “twindemic,” a season in which COVID-19 and Influenza are just as infectious.

Even those that do not traditionally receive their flu vaccine are encouraged to consider it this season, as the possibility of a twindemic or flu outbreak on campus alongside steadily climbing late year COVID numbers could send the La Salle community back online if not kept in check.
To register for a COVID-19 bivalent booster, flu vaccine or both, click here or email COVID19@lasalle.edu for details.